Kilimanjaro Lemosho Route & Safari

13 days
from
£4,199
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Traveller ratings
4.9 / 5 from 16 reviews >
Trip code: 
TYU
Ways to Travel:
Guided Group, Tailormade Adventures
Activity:
Point-to-point
Min age:
16
Group size:
4–16

Follow the lesser trekked Lemosho Route and go on safari in Ngorongoro and Serengeti

After a rewarding climb on Kilimanjaro's Lemosho Route, go on safari in Tanzania’s national parks. First is great wildlife viewing in the natural sanctuary of Ngorongoro Crater, the best chance to see the threatened rhinoceros, as well as an abundance of other wildlife. Follow this with the vast open plains of the Serengeti, teeming with wildlife, especially during the seasonal wildebeest migration, and benefit from a flight back to Arusha, maximising our game viewing time.

Highlights

  • A stunning eight-day route, designed to maximise acclimatisation
  • Stand on top of a continent, an unforgettable experience
  • We use 1 guide for every 2 clients
  • A classic safari to some of East Africa's finest game parks
  • The magnificent natural bowl of Ngorongoro Crater and the Serengeti

Key information

  • 3 nights comfortable hotels and 2 nights comfortable permanent camp, all en suite
  • 7 nights full-service camping in 3 man tents
  • 8 days point-to-point walking with full porterage 
  • Group normally 4 - 16, plus leader. Min age 18 yrs
  • Altitude maximum 5895m, average 4000m
  • On safari we travel in 4WD land cruisers or landrovers depending on the group size
  • 15kg weight limit whilst on trek

 

What's included

  • All breakfasts, 12 lunches and 11 dinners
  • All accommodation
  • All transport and listed activities
  • Tour leader throughout
  • Flights from London (if booking incl. flights)
  • Kilimanjaro Park Fee

What's not included

  • Travel insurance
  • Visas and vaccinations
  • Single supplement  (available on request - includes single tent)
  • Equipment hire
Call us on
074 340 4587
Trip Notes

Click on the button below for detailed Trip Notes containing all the particulars about this trip, including kit lists and practical information.

Note: these can vary by departure; you can check out the specific Trip Notes for your chosen adventure on the dates & prices page.

8

Pace:

Approximately 7.1km/4.4miles hours walking per day

Terrain:

High altitude; including steep, rocky terrain

Day by day breakdown
Day 27.0km/4.0miles
Day 38.0km/4.5miles
Day 410.0km/6.0miles
Day 58.0km/4.0miles
Day 65.0km/3.0miles
Day 73.0km/1.0miles
Day 811.0km/6.0miles
Day 95.0km/3.0miles

Responsible Travel

At Exodus we believe in the power of Responsible Travel.

Every time we travel, we are part of a global movement that creates jobs, builds more sustainable societies, encourages cultural understanding and safeguards common natural and cultural heritage. To learn more about what Responsible Travel means to Exodus click here… 

Established in 2003, the Kilimanjaro Porters Assistance Project (KPAP) is a legally registered Tanzanian not-for-profit organization, whose aim is to improve the working conditions of the porters on Kilimanjaro.

Once you  have climbed Mount Kilimanjaro you’ll appreciate that porters are the backbone of the trek.. KPAP’s focus is improving the working conditions of the porters by: 

Lending mountain clothing to porters free of charge

Advocating for fair wages and ethical treatment by all companies climbing Kilimanjaro

Encouraging climbers to select a climbing company with responsible treatment practices towards their crew

Providing educational opportunities to the mountain crew

African Walking Company is a member of KPAP which means they sign up to these clear aims, in keeping with Exodus’s approach to treks using human porterage.

Please check their website for more details https://kiliporters.org/

Itinerary

  • Day 1

    Start Arusha.

    There will be a trip briefing this afternoon/evening. Please bring your passport and insurance details, and your air ticket details. The briefing will cover all aspects of your trip and will include the distribution of any hired equipment you have booked.
    Comfortable Hotel

    Meals included: Dinner
  • Day 2

    To Londorossi; begin ascent to Lemosho forest.

    In the morning we transfer to Londorossi (2250 m), passing between the slopes of Kilimanjaro and the horseshoe-shaped volcanic crater of Mt. Meru (a distance of about 120 km). After completing the necessary registration formalities, we drive on for a short distance through farmland and plantations to reach the Lemosho roadhead. The last 5 km of the road to the park gate is of poor quality, particularly after rain, and the drive there should be considered part of the adventure. We often have lunch in the glades before starting to walk. It is an easy day of walking up a small path through beautiful and lush forest, (this area has a variety of game including buffalo). We camp at Lemosho Forest camp (2650 m). Approx 3-4 hours walking.
    Full-service Camping

    Meals included: Breakfast Lunch Dinner
  • Day 3

    Explore Shira Plateau; camp at Shira One.

    The trail starts out in the lush rich montane forest before ascending into the moorland zone of giant heather. The trail climbs steadily with views across the plains opening out as we reach the rim of the Shira Plateau. There is a tangible sense of wilderness especially if the afternoon mists come in. We camp in the centre of the plateau at Shira One (3550 m). Approx 6-7 hours walking.
    Full-service Camping

    Meals included: Breakfast Lunch Dinner
  • Day 4

    Walk to Shira Cathedral to camp at Shira Hut.

    A day to help acclimatisation and to explore the grassy moorland and the volcanic rock formations of the plateau. We walk to the summit of Shira Cathedral, a huge buttress of rock surrounded by steep spires and pinnacles. There is a tangible sense of wilderness here (especially when the afternoon mists come in!) and the views from our camp near Shira Hut (3840m) of Mt. Meru floating on the clouds are simply unforgettable. The afternoon is free to relax. Approx 4-5 hours walking.
    Full-service Camping

    Meals included: Breakfast Lunch Dinner
  • Day 5

    Descend; camp at Great Barranco Valley.

    A morning of gentle ascent and panoramic views, walking on lava ridges beneath the glaciers of the Western Breach. After lunch near the Lava Tower junction (4550m), we descend to the bottom of the Great Barranco valley (3900m), sheltered by towering cliffs and with extensive views of the plains far below. Approx 5-7 hours walking.
    Full-service Camping

    Meals included: Breakfast Lunch Dinner
  • Day 6

    Over the Barranco Wall to Karanga.

    A short steep climb up the famous Barranco Wall leads us to an undulating trail on the south-eastern flank of Kibo, with superb vistas of the Southern Icefields. The terrain changes to volcanic scree, with pockets of lush vegetation in sheltered hollows, and a powerful sense of mountain wilderness. Our next camp is at Karanga (4000m) a short distance away, the valley floor has the last water point on the approach to Barafu, whilst we camp on the higher sides of the valley with views towards the glaciers of the southern icefields. Approx 4-5 hours walking.
    Full-service Camping

    Meals included: Breakfast Lunch Dinner
  • Day 7

    Steep ascent to Barafu campsite, with optional afternoon ascent to bottom of S.E. Valley.

    The trail follows a path on compacted scree with wide views including the Barafu Ridge where our camp lies, the trail climbs unrelentingly to reach the Barafu campsite (4600m) for lunch. There is a short acclimatisation walk to the plateau at the bottom of the Southeast valley (4800m). The remainder of the day is spent resting in preparation for the final ascent before a very early night. Approx 3-5 hours walking.
    Full-service Camping

    Meals included: Breakfast Lunch Dinner
  • Day 8

    An early start to reach Stella Point in time for sunrise: on to Uhuru Peak. Descend to Millennium Camp.

    We will start our ascent by torchlight around midnight so that we can be up on the Crater rim by sunrise. The steep climb over loose volcanic scree has some well-graded zigzags and a slow but steady pace will take us to Stella Point (5735m), in about five or six hours. We will rest there for a short time to enjoy the sunrise over Mawenzi. Those who are still feeling strong can make the two hour round trip from here along the crater rim to Uhuru Peak (5,895m), passing close to the spectacular glaciers and ice cliffs that still occupy most of the summit area. The descent to Barafu is surprisingly fast, and after some refreshment, we continue to descend to reach our final campsite (3800m) at Millenium camp. Most of us will be too tired to notice the beauty of the forest surrounding the crowded campsite. This is an extremely long and hard day with between 11 and 15 hours of walking at high altitude.
    Full-service Camping

    Meals included: Breakfast Lunch Dinner
  • Day 9

    To Mweka Gate; transfer to Arusha.

    A sustained descent on a well-constructed path through lovely tropical forest alive with birdsong and boasting lush undergrowth with considerable botanical interest. Our route winds down to the national park gate at Mweka (1650m); and on through coffee and banana farms to Mweka village. The shower, the beer, and the swimming pool are tantalisingly close! We return by bus to Arusha (a distance of about 100 km). It is recommended that you repack your bags and leave all your Kilimanjaro climb equipment at the hotel because of the small luggage allowance on the flight returning from the Serengeti. Approx 4-6 hours walking.
    Comfortable Hotel

    Meals included: Breakfast Lunch Dinner
  • Day 10

    Crater game drive in Ngorongoro.

    A specialist safari driver/guide will meet you at the lodge in Arusha at 7.30 am and we then drive to Ngorongoro Conservation Area. Ngorongoro is a conservation area rather than a national park; this means the whole area is managed for both the animals and the local Masai people who graze their cattle along side the indigenous wildlife. After stopping at the entrance gate, where there is a chance to learn a bit more about this fascinating volcanic landscape, we will drive around the rim of the crater itself. From here we can look down and see the herds of wildebeest or elephant. Finally we descend into the crater whose walls provide a natural sanctuary for the animals. This means there is plenty to see: lion, elephant, buffalo, rhino and leopard. The only animal you won't see in here is a giraffe whose long legs are unable to cope with the steep sides of the crater.
    Comfortable Hotel

    Meals included: Breakfast Lunch Dinner
  • Day 11

    To Serengeti via Olduvai Gorge, afternoon game drive.

    We head towards the Serengeti National Park, en route there is an opportunity to visit Olduvai Gorge. It is within this steep sided ravine that Louis and Mary Leakey made some of the world's most important archaeological discoveries in the 1950s. Here in a small museum we are able to see evidence of our ancestors that have been dated up to 2.5 million years old. After lunch we drive into the Serengeti itself and the rest of the afternoon is spent game viewing in the vast plains that are broken only by stands of acacia trees and the occasional kopje. In December, January and February we will normally meet the migration with large herds of wildebeest, zebra, and gazelle. There are always plenty of resident animals, such as giraffe, buffalo, and elephant, and many large predators such as lion, cheetah, and leopard. We spend tonight in a comfortable permanent camp where we can enjoy the immense Africa skies and fall asleep listening to the sound of the bush.
    Comfortable Camping

    Meals included: Breakfast Lunch Dinner
  • Day 12

    Full day in Serengeti.

    We have another full day here rising early to make the most of our time. There are excellent opportunities for game viewing around the nearby Seronera River, with crocodiles and hippos in the pools and large lion prides in the area. Our camp is excellently situated, so you have good chances of catching the migration, even outside the obvious months of December, January and February; in fact you might not need to go very far in July and August, since the herds often pass close to, and even through, the camp! In July a drive to the Western Corridor is an excellent opportunity to see the wildebeest cross the Grumeti River, home to some of the largest crocodiles in Africa. In August and September, a drive to the northern part of Serengeti near Lobo, provides an opportunity to view the migration as well as a scenic and little visited part of Serengeti.
    Comfortable Camping

    Meals included: Breakfast Lunch Dinner
  • Day 13

    Fly to Arusha; end.

    Our final day, we leave the Serengeti National Park, but even the drive to the airport will offer us some game viewing opportunities. We fly from here to Arusha, where we will have a good lunch and collect any luggage (Kilimanjaro equipment) left at the hotel, and maybe enjoy a bit of shopping, before we head to the airport for our flight home (for those on the group flights).

    Meals included: Breakfast Lunch
Trip Notes

Click on the button below for detailed Trip Notes containing all the particulars about this trip, including kit lists and practical information.

Note: these can vary by departure; you can check out the specific Trip Notes for your chosen adventure on the dates & prices page.

Extend Your Trip

Zanzibar

Zanzibar
If you are keen to end your holiday on a very relaxed note Zanzibar is a place to relax on the beach, to explore the colourful reef offshore, or to simply relax and soak up the sun! You can choose to add on as many extra nights to your trip as you wish; your time on the island will be at leisure for you to do as you wish. We transfer to Kilimanjaro Airport and fly to Zanzibar, on arrival we transfer to the south west coast of the island. The accommodation used, Fumba Beach Lodge is far from other developments, the feeling of peace is all encompassing and there is a long strip of private beach, pool, spa, diving centre and spacious rooms. Please note that on Zanzibar you will be met and transferred between the airport and hotel but you are not escorted or guided. If you choose to take advantage of this opportunity then we can arrange flights for you to Zanzibar as well as booking the hotel on half board and included all the transfers needed.

Prices -from £275 per twin room per night in 2017

from £295 per twin room per night in 2018

Transfers to and from Zanzibar airport are £60 each way for up to 4 people in a vehicle

We can also book other hotels for you on the island including Kichanga Lodge and Tembo Hotel.

Essential Info

Visas

Tanzania

Most nationalities require a tourist visa for Tanzania, including British nationals, most EC nationals, Australians, New Zealanders, Americans and Canadians. The visa is available at the border and the cost for British and most other European Nationals is USD50 cash, whilst for US citizens it is USD100 cash.

Vaccinations

Tanzania

Please note that although Tanzania does not officially require proof of Yellow Fever vaccination, at most airports and other points of entry you may be required to show a certificate of vaccination or an exemption certificate. This includes coming from Europe via, or transiting through an endemic country including the airports of Nairobi (Kenya) and Addis Ababa (Ethiopia). If visiting Zanzibar from mainland Tanzania border officials have been known to demand proof of Yellow Fever vaccination or an exemption certificate.

Recommended vaccinations are: Polio, Tetanus, Typhoid, Hepatitis A. Malaria prophylaxis is essential and we suggest that you seek advice from your GP or travel health clinic about which malaria tablets to take. Dengue fever is a known risk in places visited. It is a tropical viral disease spread by daytime biting mosquitoes. There is currently no vaccine or prophylaxis available for Dengue, and therefore the best form of prevention is to avoid being bitten. We recommend you take the usual precautions to avoid mosquito bites.

Eating and Drinking

All breakfasts, 12 lunches and 11 dinners included.

On trek the emphasis is on a varied and well balanced diet with fresh fruit and soup to maximise the daily intake of fluids. Vegetarians are well catered for but you should inform Exodus before departure of any special dietary requests.  In Tanzania the availability of certain products for restricted diets, e.g. gluten-free or dairy-free, is minimal or non-existent so we strongly recommend you bring specialised dietary items from home.

You may find it beneficial to bring some 'summit snacks' with you; summit day is a long trekking day and high energy snacks are not readily available in Tanzania. All meals during the climb and safari are included. Please allow about GBP10 (USD15) for meals not included.

Water

Whilst the water we provide on Kilimanjaro is suitable for drinking you may wish to be extra safe and treat it with your own water purification tablets.  Biox Aqua drops or tablets are the best available alternative for sale in the UK as they kill giardia and crytosporidium.

Weather

Although Tanzania lies in the tropics, the temperature depends more on altitude than on season. Northern Tanzania has temperatures ranging from 16ºC to 23ºC in August, rising to 18ºC to 28ºC in February. The 'long rains', during which we do not operate trips, occur from late March to May, and there are intermittent 'short rains' in November and December, though the latter have no great effect on mountain climbs.

Kilimanjaro can be climbed at any time of the year but it is usually very wet in the rain forest in April and May. January and February are the warmest months. Above the cloud line the days are warm and pleasant, with temperatures in sunlight often above 20ºC, but the nights can get very cold. It is possible for temperatures to get as low as -20ºC at Barafu campsite, our highest overnight stop. The daily weather pattern on the mountain tends to be clear mornings with an afternoon cloud build-up that often clears before sunset. In the (European) summer, the weather is usually cloudy at lower altitudes and often sunny above 3,500 m. Please note that mountain weather conditions are never totally predictable and we may meet wet and snowy conditions at any time.

Is this trip for you?

Grade 6- Challenging/ Tough

The summit attempt is graded 7 / tough because of the high altitude and the level of physical effort needed. Please be aware many clients find the summit day on Kilimanjaro the toughest physical challenge of their life. The rest of the trek is graded as 5- challenging, more as a consequence of the high altitude and extended wilderness camping than the difficulty of walking; hence the overall grading of this trek as challenging/tough.

Maximum altitude 5895m. This is a long and hard trek, which reaches an altitude of 5,895m. Even if you consider yourself fit, you might still find the climb very hard, depending on how well your body acclimatises to high altitude. There is no scientific way to determine how easily you might acclimatise, and be aware that the process  can differ from climb to climb. Most of the trails on the Kilimanjaro trek are well defined and of good quality but some forest sections can be slippery and moorland paths can be very wet in poor weather conditions. The final ascent to Uhuru peak is almost exclusively on scree and loose rock without permanent footpaths but no technical skills are required.

During the course of the trip we shall spend time at both high and low altitude, experiencing both extremely cold and quite hot conditions. You should be prepared for an early start every day on Kilimanjaro. The rate of ascent to high altitude on Kilimanjaro is rapid because of the shape and isolated nature of the mountain. Despite careful pacing and adequate hydration, it is probable that many trekkers will experience mild altitude sickness. Most recover quickly; but those affected by serious altitude problems will need to descend to a lower altitude with a member of the local staff and probably abandon the trek in the interests of safety. Please report any symptoms of altitude illness to our Guides immediately and be prepared to follow their advice. The decision of the Senior Local Guide in such situations will be final. Over 30,000 people attempt the climb of Kilimanjaro annually and there are, on average, two or three fatalities from Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS) every year. These fatalities are always the result of the failure to undertake a rapid descent quickly enough. Our Guides have had formal training to recognise and deal quickly with the symptoms of AMS, whilst our medical box contains drugs to facilitate a rapid descent together with an evacuation plan from each campsite on Kilimanjaro. Please note that thorough training and preparation still offer no guarantees in the remote and abnormal conditions that exist at higher altitudes on Kilimanjaro. Although rare, a number of medical conditions can also reduce your body's ability to acclimatise, and thus will affect your performance at altitude and make you more susceptible to AMS. If you are worried about any pre-existing condition (e.g. heart problems), or unsure of your physical ability, we recommend that you seek medical advice prior to booking.

During the safari we travel in 4WD safari vehicles with open tops allowing excellent game viewing. There will be some long drives but as most of these will be in parks and conservation areas they will allow for constant animal spotting. The flight from the Serengeti to Arusha is a domestic flight in a small aircraft.

Call us on
074 340 4587
Trip Notes

Click on the button below for detailed Trip Notes containing all the particulars about this trip, including kit lists and practical information.

Note: these can vary by departure; you can check out the specific Trip Notes for your chosen adventure on the dates & prices page.

Accommodation

Hotels, Lodges & Camping

3 nights comfortable hotels/lodge, 2 nights comfortable permanent camp, all en suite, 7 nights full-service camping in 3 man tents.
You will spend 3 nights in comfortable hotels and lodges with 2 nights in permanent camps with en suite facilities. During the climb you will have 7 nights of full-service camping, with a private toilet tent. We can arrange extra accommodation before or after the trip.

A single supplement is available from GBP470 (includes single tent)

Call us on
074 340 4587
Trip Notes

Click on the button below for detailed Trip Notes containing all the particulars about this trip, including kit lists and practical information.

Note: these can vary by departure; you can check out the specific Trip Notes for your chosen adventure on the dates & prices page.

Experts

Contact a member of staff who has done this trip

Call us on
074 340 4587
Trip Notes

Click on the button below for detailed Trip Notes containing all the particulars about this trip, including kit lists and practical information.

Note: these can vary by departure; you can check out the specific Trip Notes for your chosen adventure on the dates & prices page.

Expert Blog Entries

African sunset

From the volcanic slopes of Kilimanjaro to the highland plateaux of the Simien Mountains, Exodus has cultivated an ar

Exodus has been specialising in offering incredible, life-changing moments to our travellers for over 40 years; now,

  • Reviewed November 2017
    Oliver C

    The Roof of Africa & The Big 5!

    Everything about this trip was fantastic from beginning to end! The mountain hiking was brilliant, with the scenery changing slowly from lush tropical forest to the barren moonscapes of the summit with almost everything in between. The help, encouragement and guidance we received from the whole team, from the leader to the porters, was incredible and they played a huge part in ensuring the entire group had the privilege of standing on the roof of Africa. The summit is a grim 6 hour uphill struggle through the night, but it is almost instantly forgotten as you stand on Stella Point to watch the sun's first rays light up Mawenzi Peak. From there it is a further 45 minutes to Uhuru Peak - the highest point in Africa. After 6 days and a night of walking at this point the sense of relief and achievement cannot be overstated! The food on the mountain was plentiful, and given the circumstances, very tasty. Spirits in the camp were high throughout the trip (even when the zip for the toilet tent broke) and there was a real sense of togetherness in the team to ensure everyone reached their goals. Once we were down and showered, and had had a few beers to celebrate the achievement, it was time for the safari. Over the following 3 days we were lucky enough to see everything we could have hoped for, including close encounters with a leopard, a pack of lions with cubs, elephants, giraffes and countless other animals. The sheer numbers of wildlife in both the Ngorongoro Crater and the Serengeti was breathtaking, and it was wonderful to see the animals interacting with each other in their natural habitat. The base for the final two night of the trip was a permanent tented camp on the outskirts of the Serengeti, which although it took a little getting used to (being escorted back from dinner by a man with a gun was an interesting experience!), waking up to the African dawn chorus in the midst of so many amazing animals was a great way to end the trip! I just want to put a little disclaimer on this review that I work for Exodus in the UK Head Office, but this was my first time travelling with them and it has made me extremely proud of the company I work for.

    What was the most inspirational moment of your trip?

    Standing on the summit of Kilimanjaro. Seeing a wild leopard stalking her prey up close.
  • Reviewed March 2016
    Aileen Hunter

    Review of Kilimanjaro Lemosho Route and Safari

    Arrangements prior to our travel were very good indeed with Kate at Exodus exploring lots of options for our rather complicated itinerary from Aberdeen and Rwanda to the start of our trip at Arusha. Our chief guide, Makeke, was very welcoming and highly professional throughout but wasn't terribly aware that payment for our transfers had been made or of the arrangements at the end of the safari for transfer back to Kilimanjaro airport for our flights home. In the end, we had to pay for a room in which to shower at Kia Lodge and for the transfer to the airport. This part of the plan was not made clear to us at all beforehand and seemed rather ad hoc on the day.. However, once, the trek began, we quickly fell into camp routine and gelled as a team. This was greatly aided by the good nature and positive approach of the assistant guides and porters. Even when the inevitable effects of altitude took their toll of us on different days, the guides encouraged us and we regained our self-belief. Catering throughout was extraordinary given the camp conditions and the need for every item to be carried, unpacked and packed again every day. There was never a shortage of tasty food. All of us were well fed and only suffered from the predictable loss of appetite once or twice. Porters were outstanding. The two girls who carried our gear welcomed us into camp each afternoon with congratulations and smiles even although they had carried more than twice our loads at high speed past us. We certainly take our hats of to them all. The summit day was one of the most challenging of our mountaineering experience. Don't be lulled into false expectations because of the term, trek. It was a very serious and demanding mountain experience that took everyone to their limit. The cold, the driving icy wind and the altitude conspired to make us feel absolutely miserable. However, the guides maintained the necessary "pole pole" pace for us to maintain confidence that we could reach the summit. Ten out of twelve of us succeeded in this. The determination in some team colleagues was inspiring. Disappointingly, we had little opportunity to take photographs as the guides seemed to be working to a tight schedule for descent. Frustration about opportunities to stop for photos and drinking had surfaced earlier when, despite constant advice to drink from the guides, we were given little opportunity to do so while walking. The descent back to Barafu Camp was as grueling in some ways as the ascent with the further challenge of another descent to Millennium Camp. The next and last day also involved a massive descent back into the heat of the rain forest that was the final test of endurance. We were very glad to have succeeded in the climb but gladder that it was over. The stage of the trip that we had rather neglected in our thinking was the safari with the focus being on Kilimanjaro but it proved to be an absolute highlight. The landscapes, the density, variety and proximity of the wonderful animals and the quiet expertise of our safari guide were all utterly memorable. We would advise anyone to add on this element if they can. It was exciting, awe-inspiring and relaxing with perfectly tuned accommodation and great quality catering.

    What was the most inspirational moment of your trip?

    Reaching the summit of Kilimanjaro together, as a couple, was one of the most emotional (in a positive way) experiences we've had. The multi-sensory experience of being close to so many of the iconic African animals while on safari really brought home to us how important they are for us all.

    What did you think of your group leader?

    Both our Kilimanjaro leader and safari leader were highly professional and knowledgeable. They conveyed a respect for their environments as well as a love of their country, Tanzania. They were totally trustworthy and a credit to themselves and that country.

    Do you have any advice for potential travellers?

    Read the trip notes very carefully and take note of the advice. The notes are very accurate so there should be no surprises or disappointments if you take them into account. Be prepared for your legs and knees to suffer a wee bit being folded into a Land Rover for a few days immediately after 8 days of walking and climbing.
  • Reviewed October 2015
    Elizabeth Kilgallon

    Kilimanjaro Lemosho Route and Safari

    Great trek to the 'Roof of Africa' followed by a enthralling safari taking in the Ngorongoro Crater, Olduvai Gorge and the Serengeti.

    What was the most inspirational moment of your trip?

    Standing on the summit of Kilimanjaro was amazing and Summit day was the hardest piece of trekking I have ever done - quite literally breaktaking! But there were great views and experiences along the way too - a stunning view from Shira Cathedral of Kilimanjaro, Mt Meru and the Shira plateau and I loved climbing the Barranco Wall and then discovering an absolutely delightful valley a little later the same day - it was my favourite day of trekking - I loved it! The view of the Ngorongoro crater from the view point on the crater's edge was astounding and the Olduvai Gorge - the cradle of mankind - was incredible. And on Safari the sights and sounds both day and night were magical at times. We saw so many different animals and birds that I lost count.

    What did you think of your group leader?

    Meke our group leader was fantastic. So cheerful and encouraging and showing real concern for all of us. I would not have made it to the summit without him and the other guides in our group (Wilfried and Said), they were great.

    Do you have any advice for potential travellers?

    Some physical preparation before the trip will pay off and make the whole trek more enjoyable. Listen to your guides - they are experts and know what they are talking about. You don't need to change your currency to Shillings, US dollars are accepted everywhere that you go on this trip, just make sure they are newish. The drive across the Serengeti was very, very bumpy - just be prepared for it, after all it is a Safari in Africa. Be prepared to come home dirty and dusty but very happy!

    Is there anything else you would like to add?

    I have just had the time of my life! Everything was well organised, trouble free and I always felt safe and looked after - without being molly-coddled. I can't wait to do another trip and would definitely book with Exodus again.
  • Reviewed November 2014

    Great hike and safari

    Ascent of Kilimanjaro along the Lemosho route, followed by safari through Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Oldupai Gorge and Serengeti. The ascent, run by the African Walking Company, was extremely well run. The guides and porters could not do enough to provide first rate support for the group and made sure everyone was catered for, even if it meant splitting the group up into differing abilities. Im quite a large guy, and felt a little uneasy on some of the slopes which we had to scramble up, but the guides patiently helped me up and never rushed me. There was rarely any shortage of food or drink, and everything was provided when required. Everyone in our group summitted and team spirits remained high throughout. The follow up safari, run by Karibu safaris, provided a relaxing wind down to the ascent. Despite this, we were left feeling it was arranged as an after thought rather than principal part of the trip.

    What was the most inspirational moment of your trip?

    Summiting Uhuru peak, and watching the sunrise over Mawenzi peak at 5600m below Stella Point.

    What did you think of your group leader?

    The climb group leader Meke was first rate, his experience of climbing the mountain was second to none and his team of guides were equally top notch. They all made us feel like they had our very best interests at heart and went that extra mile to make sure we all succeeded.

    Do you have any advice for potential travellers?

    Ascent - Bring at least one lock per kitbag, while the guides and porters within our group were trustworthy, they advised extra vigilance when stopping in campsites - Follow the advice of the guides on the mountain. - Pack economically, but effectively. Don't overpack your day pack as you'll run the risk of exhaustion on the lower slopes, which will impact your performance higher up. - Get as much sleep as you can, when ascending, and save the partying for when you come back down. - Eat and drink as much as possible, and as often as possible. As you get higher up the mountain, you will need as much energy as you can get. I frequently polished off all of the meals put in front of me, and summitted without the need for any diamox and without any headaches. - When renting kit, make sure it is the correct size before reaching the mountain. I rented a sleeping bag which turned out to be too small. Despite the best efforts of the guides to replace it once on the mountain, they didnt have any suitable replacement. Ultimately, I needed to wear extra layers in bed, to keep warm, though by summit night, I was well aware of the best combination of layers for keeping warm in the night air. - Do rent a sleeping mat though, as its not included in your 15kg bag limit, and generally much better for sleeping on the mountain than a thermarest - Trim your toenails extra short for summit night... the descent from Kibo involves skiing down scree, for an extended period. Even after two weeks, my toes are still sore from the experience. - A lightweight but rigid, waterproof sleeve/envelope would be useful for carrying your summit certificate in to ensure it doesnt get damaged during the safari Safari - A good pair of binoculars will pay dividends If transiting Addis Ababa, try some of the local dishes at the airport.

    Is there anything else you would like to add?

    Special mention for Emmanuel, our driver from the African Walking Company, who drove us to the mountain, picked us up afterwards, and also met us after the safari to transfer us to our flight home. Like everyone else in the African Walking Company, he was always cheerful and helpful, and couldnt do enough to help us out. The organisation of the safari was less satisfactory as we didn't receive any update when returning from the mountain as to how, or at what time, we would meet our guide. Despite asking at reception for an approximate time, we found that our guide arrived half an hour earlier than anticipated, meaning our departure was somewhat hurried. Unlike on the ascent, no additional information was provided as to where we were going or what we could expect. While the guide was perfectly competent at finding lots of animals, we seemed to simply drive from place to place randomly. We were provided basic printed maps of Kili for the climb, however I feel similar maps of Ngorongoro and the Serengeti would have framed this part of the trip better. There were information centres at Ngorongoro and the Serengeti which could also have provided this additional information, but these weren't pointed out when we arrived. That aside, Id still highly recommend this overall trip.
  • Reviewed November 2014

    Great hike and safari

    Ascent of Kilimanjaro along the Lemosho route, followed by safari through Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Oldupai Gorge and Serengeti. The ascent, run by the African Walking Company, was extremely well run. The guides and porters could not do enough to provide first rate support for the group and made sure everyone was catered for, even if it meant splitting the group up into differing abilities. Im quite a large guy, and felt a little uneasy on some of the slopes which we had to scramble up, but the guides patiently helped me up and never rushed me. There was rarely any shortage of food or drink, and everything was provided when required. Everyone in our group summitted and team spirits remained high throughout. The follow up safari, run by Karibu safaris, provided a relaxing wind down to the ascent. Despite this, we were left feeling it was arranged as an after thought rather than principal part of the trip.

    What was the most inspirational moment of your trip?

    Summiting Uhuru peak, and watching sunrise over Mawenzi peak, below Stella Point.

    What did you think of your group leader?

    The climb group leader Meke was first rate, his experience of climbing the mountain was second to none and his team of guides were equally top notch. They all made us feel like they had our very best interests at heart and went that extra mile to make sure we all succeeded.

    Do you have any advice for potential travellers?

    Ascent - Bring at least one lock per kitbag, while the guides and porters within our group were trustworthy, they advised extra vigilance when stopping in campsites - Follow the advice of the guides on the mountain. - Pack economically, but effectively. Don't overpack your day pack as you'll run the risk of exhaustion on the lower slopes, which will impact your performance higher up. - Get as much sleep as you can, when ascending, and save the partying for when you come back down. - Eat and drink as much as possible, and as often as possible. As you get higher up the mountain, you will need as much energy as you can get. I frequently polished off all of the meals put in front of me, and summitted without the need for any diamox and without any headaches. - When renting kit, make sure it is the correct size before reaching the mountain. I rented a sleeping bag which turned out to be too small. Despite the best efforts of the guides to replace it once on the mountain, they didnt have any suitable replacement. Ultimately, I needed to wear extra layers in bed, to keep warm, though by summit night, I was well aware of the best combination of layers for keeping warm in the night air. - Do rent a sleeping mat though, as its not included in your 15kg bag limit, and generally much better for sleeping on the mountain than a thermarest - Trim your toenails extra short for summit night... the descent from Kibo involves skiing down scree, for an extended period. Even after two weeks, my toes are still sore from the experience. - A lightweight but rigid, waterproof sleeve/envelope would be useful for carrying your summit certificate in to ensure it doesnt get damaged during the safari Safari - A good pair of binoculars will pay dividends If transiting Addis Ababa, try some of the local dishes at the airport.

    Is there anything else you would like to add?

    Special mention for Emmanuel, our driver from the African Walking Company, who drove us to the mountain, picked us up afterwards, and also met us after the safari to transfer us to our flight home. Like everyone else in the African Walking Company, he was always cheerful and helpful, and couldnt do enough to help us out. The organisation of the safari was less satisfactory as we didn't receive any update when returning from the mountain as to how, or at what time, we would meet our guide. Despite asking at reception for an approximate time, we found that our guide arrived half an hour earlier than anticipated, meaning our departure was somewhat hurried. Unlike on the ascent, no additional information was provided as to where we were going or what we could expect. While the guide was perfectly competent at finding lots of animals, we seemed to simply drive from place to place randomly. We were provided basic printed maps of Kili for the climb, however I feel similar maps of Ngorongoro and the Serengeti would have framed this part of the trip better. There were information centres at Ngorongoro and the Serengeti which could also have provided this additional information, but these weren't pointed out when we arrived. That aside, Id still highly recommend this overall trip.
  • Reviewed September 2014
    Judith Smith

    Kilimanjaro by lemosho and safari

    The climb and safari exceeded our expectations. Yes Africa worked it's magic but the local Exodus staff did a brilliant job to make experiencing it easy!

    What was the most inspirational moment of your trip?

    Dawn on the rim of the crater.

    What did you think of your group leader?

    Charles on Kilimanjaro was excellent. Knew his stuff and organised his team with quiet efficiency. Also supportive of all his customers, and helped us achieve our goals. 100 per cent to the roof of Africa was not a surprise.

    Do you have any advice for potential travellers?

    A bit of fitness before hand helps. Know your kit. Listen to your guides, there knowledge is vast and they want to share it!

    Is there anything else you would like to add?

    Exodus flight arrangements could be better. Why were we given a 7 hour changeover at Heathrow on the way back when there was an earlier flight with a still generous 3 hour transfer which others were offered? When we found this out we could not change with BA. Outbound through Addis there was no food or drinks in transit. This should be flagged in advance.

    Reply from Exodus

    Reply from Exodus

    We are delighted that the trip exceeded Judith’s expectations and that she felt our local team did a brilliant job. We were sorry to read, however, that Judith felt that her flight arrangements could have been better. Our sales team booked regional flights for Judith from Heathrow to her regional airport and on the inbound leg of the journey she was given a rather generous amount of connection time at Heathrow. As it is not possible to check-in luggage all the way through to the end destination for this particular flight connection, our sales department would always err on the side of caution when booking connecting flights in case there are any flight delays. Please be aware, however, that our sales team are always more than happy to look at alternative flight options for our clients when requested. We would also like to thank Judith for her suggestion of explaining to clients in advance that on the outbound leg of the journey there is no possibility to have food or drinks in transit at Addis Ababa airport; we will consider including this information in the trip notes. Emma Garrick - Trip Manager for Kilimanjaro

  • Reviewed August 2014
    Anonymous

    Woo hoo I did it and loved every minute

    Mind blowing, tough but achievable, great sense of achievement, guides and crew were all fantastic and thankfully the trek was not as busy as I expected. Would do it again and again

    What was the most inspirational moment of your trip?

    When I was petrified about going up the Barranco wall, was given so much support from all my guides, that it made me feel it was achievable and I did it with their help no problems.

    What did you think of your group leader?

    JT (Justin Thomas) was a fantastic leader, very helpful and always had a big smile on his face, gave lots of encouragement when required, lots of interesting facts about Kimbo, the wildlife and flora. Had a good relationship with his crew and was well organised. His assistant guides Viviano, Saidi, Jacob and Lazaro were all excellent.

    Do you have any advice for potential travellers?

    Embrace the challenge, listen to the guides they know what they are doing and are very helpful and good at their job. Open your heart to Killi and enjoy it

    Is there anything else you would like to add?

    This was by far the best trip I have every had, I loved it and would do it again without hesitation, I would also make sure I had the same team The Dream team. JT and his crew, they we're fantastic all the way, have made some good friends for life. Thank you Exodus. May I also say the food up Killi was out of this world. The safari was also magical and our driver/guide Alex Martin was very knowledgeable knew his animals etc very well, it was a fantastic end my trip. Go do it you'll love it
  • Reviewed November 2013
    Anonymous

    KILIMANJARO - LEMOSHO ROUTE AND SAFARI

    Fantastic trip - even better than I anticipated.  I loved it and have talked of nothing else since I came home!

    What was the most inspirational moment of your trip?

    So much to choose from - the stars at night were spectacular, the views from our tent in the mornings, the gradual journey up the mountain and of course reaching the summit.  Overall - the fact I'd travelled to Africa on my own, met a group of strangers and was camping and climbing Kilimanjaro and loving it was just amazing  

    What did you think of your group leader?

    Abraham was fantastic.  He knew the mountain so well and was obviously extremely experienced.  He was attentive to all of us, checking how we were feeling twice a day and giving calm sensible advice.  My tent mate struggled significantly with the altitude and he looked after her (and all of us) so well.  I felt very safe with him in charge.  All the guides were supportive and encouraging, monitoring us and looking after us every step (literally) of the way. We wouldn't have got up there without them!

    Do you have any advice for potential travellers?

    I was worried how I would cope with the altitude and the unpredictable nature of it before I went.  I took diamox with me with the intention of taking it from the start but decided not too as other travellers put me off with talk of side effects etc.  By the second night I had a headache but it was treatable with paracetamol and ibuprofen (on and off I kept taking this for the rest of the trip and it always worked) - so take plenty and take both!!  By camp on day 3 I felt dizzy and a bit sick (a bit like being travel sick) - I started diamox (which my GP had prescribed) then. Other than a recurring (but manageable) headache, I was fine for the rest of the trip.  I noticed the effects of altitude e.g. getting out of bed in the middle of the night to go to the loo then climbing back into the tent/ sleeping bag left me breathless like I'd been sprinting and that was walking slowly!  We all followed the guides' advice - walked pole, pole (slowly, slowly), drank loads of water (LOADS - hence up to loo at night!) ate the delicious food served and rested when advised.  All but one of us was on diamox by summit night and 8 out of 12 of us made it to the summit (for some people they unfortunately didn't make the summit - in some cases because of pre-existing health problems).  I had read loads about how hard it was, esp summit night.  It was hard - but in my experience, it was do-able - just walking SO slowly behind Abraham, steadly picking our way up the mountain, crossing off the metres as he told us how high we were. I was lucky with the altitude - as were several of us - though we did all feel it in different ways (breathlessness when walking, heart racing, legs out of energy etc) but it wasn't (for me) nearly as difficult as I expected. As I say though, I was lucky and others in the group had a much much tougher time with the altitude.  If you are well prepared, follow the advice, pick a good company (like Exodus) where you will be well looked after and kept safe and pick a slow route to allow you to aclimatise - I think your chances of making the summit are good.  Even if you don't though, the experience is amazing - views the whole way up are beautiful and chances are you'll be spending a week with like minded people - our group was fab - friendly, kind and supportive of one and other and also good fun.  I went on my own which I've never done before and I felt completely part of the group the whole time - it just wasn't an issue.  Invaluable items -  merino wool leggings and top (well several tops).  We put these on when washing at camp in the evening - it gets very cold as soon as the sun goes down.  I wore mine to sleep in from first camp - wouldnt bother with pjsearplugs - some camps are busy and can be a bit noisyHead torch - for getting about camp at night and summit night toilet roll - you need this for nipping behind rocks during the dayvasaline and a good sun/ wind protector for lips platypus for waterCamera and keep it handy for taking photos all the way.  I got a spare battery for mine though didn't need it I hired the down jacket - it was very big on me and had to borrow a waterproof jacket that would fit over the top of it (though in the end this wasn't needed). The jacket was SO cosy though - I wasn't cold at all on summit night (neither was the other girl in the group who had hired the down jacket) - I was even wearing one less layer than recommended.....which isn't like me - I'm usually too cold!I didn't hire walking poles - they were marked as optional on the kit list - I've never used them and so decided not to bother.  The guides in Africa were a bit concerned about this as they felt they are important for resting on on summit night/ and to help you on way back down the mountain.  I was ok without them - but I got off lightly altitude wise I think - so it might be worth considering hiring these. In terms of training - I went hillwalking once a week.  I live in Scotland so have easy access to munros - built up to doing 3 in a day and on one day 5.  I had meant to exercise through the week.....but with work pressures, never quite got round to it.  Early on on the mountain the walking pole, pole felt easy and relaxing - time to admire the view and chat instead of rushing like at home - higher up we needed to go pole pole but my training felt sufficient.  Fitness doesn't help with chances against altitude anyway (or so I've been told)....but it does help with climbing a mountain.Finally - I took an old pair of leather walking boots which were leaking to give away - I gave them to Abraham at the start of the walk as thought no point in bringing them up the mountain.  He produced them at the tipping ceremony at the end - the porter that got them looked delighted - possibly the most delighted I've ever seen anyone look (and the chances are my leaking boots that I would otherwise have just thrown away would be too small for him) - very humbling experience.

    Is there anything else you would like to add?

    For me the trip was about Kilimanjaro but I'd never been to Africa before and I wanted to see the animals while I was there - how could you go that far and not.  It makes a nice relaxing end to the trip and is well worth doing.  Our guide was great at spotting animals and we saw everything I'd wanted to see - including a Rhino......in the distance.....if you squinted your eyes and used your imagination!I decided to share a tent though was nervous about this - it was a great decision - my tent mate was lovely and because we got on it was really nice to have the company.....and share the odd bottle of wine on safari. She was also far braver than me when it came to dealing with the spiders in our tent on safari (don't panic - there were only 2 - it was a one off - but hope for a brave tent mate.....or bring one)!Other than tips and few glasses of wine on safari/ few presents for niece and nephew I hardly spent any money.Overall - it was an amazing experience - one of the best things I've ever done - I would highly recommend it. 
  • Reviewed August 2013
    Anonymous

    KILIMANJARO - LEMOSHO ROUTE AND SAFARI

    This is a well run and organised trip and I was fortunate to have such great fellow travellers. I would highly recommend this trip.

    What was the most inspirational moment of your trip?

    Standing on top of Mount Kilimanjaro. I've been on several safaris previously and without a doubt the Serengeti is by far he best, we saw all the big cats.

    What did you think of your group leader?

    JT was amazing, such a friendly, cheerful chap. Completely on the ball and well organised. It would be a pleasure to travel with him again. The porters support was invaluable, such a friendly bunch of lads.

    Do you have any advice for potential travellers?

    Get yourself fit for Kilimanjaro and hire your kit, instead of bringing your own so that you more room in your travel bag for personal items.
  • Reviewed January 2013
    Anonymous

    KILIMANJARO - LEMOSHO ROUTE AND SAFARI

    This was just a fantastic trip.  I cannot fault the organisation of the Kilimanjaro climb itself - it was just perfect.  I am also very glad that I booked through Exodus, which uses the The Africa Walking Company as its local operator.   They had the best camping set-up that we saw on the mountain, particularly the much appreciated toilet tent!  The guides and porters were universally good and seemed to provide that little bit more than the other operators on the mountain.  The safari was also excellent - the only negative point was that we were meant to have a group leader to meet us and drop us off at the airport, but it seems like he could not allocate the time.  The safari drivers did a great job getting us to the right places and making sure we saw all our 'wish list' (!) of animals, however, and mostly made up for the lack of group leader.  It was an excellent and satisfying trip all round.

    What was the most inspirational moment of your trip?

    1.  Making it to the top of Kilimanjaro.  The final day of climbing was tiring and a bit chilly, but was absolutely worth the effort.2.  Seeing my first families of elephants, lions and hippos, and then seeing cheetahs, a leopard and crocodiles.  The vervet monkeys and baboons were also great!

    What did you think of your group leader?

    Musa, our Chief Guide on Kilimanjaro, was superb.  He was intelligent, humerous and quietly observant throughout the trip, with a complete understanding of British traits!  He had a really lovely manner and ensured that any issues were identified and dealt with as soon as possible.  He also spent a lot of time developing the other guides so they had the full range of skills needed to be a Chief Guide in the future.  He was the perfect choice for the role.Our group leader on the safari was the complete opposite.  He didn't meet us on the first day of the safari and left the drivers to sort out our divided luggage.  On the final day, he did come to meet us, but decided belatedly not to take us to the airport (where we could have done with some explanation about forms and queues).  The drivers, as I said above, did their best to make sure his absence did not impact on us, however. 

    Do you have any advice for potential travellers?

    1.  Make sure you take the full packing list as the layers are definitely needed on the final morning's climb to the summit.  Bring your gaiters as they help keep the mud (if you are unlucky enough to get rain) off your laces, which is welcome when you get to camp and can relax again.2.  Ensure all your kit is water-proofed inside your main bag, as it rained for our first 4 days and the bags (and contents) did get wet despite the additional cover added by the tour company.  3.  Ensure you have a rain cover for your day sack and good-quality waterproofs.  4.  Our packing list only said 2 x 1 litre water bottles - bring 3 or preferably a camelbak and 2 extra bottles.5.  Don't bring water purification tablets as the water is purified for you on the mountain. 

    Is there anything else you would like to add?

    I would absolutely recommend booking through Exodus!  It is a little bit more expensive than most other comapanies, but it was definitely worth it.  The Africa Walking Company is a great local operator and we ended up in a lovely group of people.  I would say that Exodus could personalise the emails it sends out after booking and before the trip - they were too generic and left you searching around for specific information on the Kilimanjaro trek (not just all treks) and little was mentioned on the safari organisation.  Apart from this and the guide problem on the safari, the trip went perfectly and I will now have great memories that will be with me for life.

Dates & Prices

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An overview of flight options

Exodus is committed to making joining our tours as easy as possible, wherever you live. We generally only block book seats from London, but this certainly does not mean that you need to fly from there. Depending on the route and airlines available, there will usually be various options available for those who want to fly from their local airport.

This page aims to provide a useful overview of the options available to our clients. However, the best flight arrangements should be tailored to your personal requirements, so please contact our Sales team for expert advice.

 

What kind of options do I have ?

1. We can book for you: Flights from anywhere in the world - not via London  

Depending on the route, this may be direct or via an overseas hub like Amsterdam, the Middle East or elsewhere. On short haul routes there may be direct flights with low cost airlines, charter flights or scheduled airlines. Exodus can book most, but not all, of these for you. The most appropriate airline may be different to that which we use for the group flight from London, but many people now travel on different airlines and meet up with their fellow passengers at the destination.

Pros Cons
  • May be the most direct route
  • Often the extra fare compared to the London flight is minimal.
  • As you will be in the hands a single airline for your entire journey, the airline will be responsible for your bags and your connections.
  • You may not be able to join the group transfers. However, we can usually arrange private transfers, or book your flights to try and coincide with the group transfers. See notes on transfer arrangements below.

 

2. We can book for you: Connecting flights from your local airport to London

Exodus can book connecting flights to London so you can join the group flight there. Connecting times will be followed according to airline advice, or as requested by clients. There are two types of fares we can use for this option: a 'through-fare' or a 'published fare'.
 
a) A 'through-fare' is where you will be in the main airline's care throughout. You change planes, but your bags are checked all the way through to your final destination. 

b) A 'published fare' ticket is completely seperate from your onward ticket from London. It is usually cheaper than a through-fare but will need to be paid for and issued as soon as it is booked. This can be a problem if your tour has not yet reached minimum numbers. On 'published fares' neither airline is aware that you have connecting flights, so Exodus is responsible for timing your connection, not the airlines involved. The tickets are also usually non changeable and non refundable.

Pros Cons
  • Depending on the fare type, Exodus or the airline is responsible for flight connections.
  • Through fare tickets can be expensive.
  • On a published fare, tickets must be issued immediately; tickets on published fares can be very difficult to change if onward flight times change; bags are not checked though to your final destination.
  • Published fares are non-refundable.

 

3. Booking some or all of the flights yourself

You can also book connecting air travel yourself, either to London, or all the way to the start point. There may be certain airlines or routes we don't have access to, so this is always an option. However, if you make your own travel arrangements you become liable for any delays, cancellations or missed connections, and Exodus is not required to offer refunds if you have trouble reaching the start of your trip.

Pros Cons
  • You might find cheaper fares, or routes not available to Exodus.
  • You are responsible for any delays or missed connections, and the cost of the tour is not protected should you miss your flight be cancelled.

 

 Notes on transfer arrangements

Sometimes it is possible to travel on a different airline to the group flight from London. Where this is the case, we need to think about ensuring you meet up with the group with minimum extra cost and hassle.

  • On certain trips, it is easy to arrive on a different flight and still meet the group at the hotel with time in hand. We can usually arrange private transfers (at extra cost) or offer advice on taking a taxi to the start hotel.
  • On other trips (especially in Europe), the transfer meets the group flight and then travels some distance to the first night's accommodation. Where this is the case, our Sales team will try to arrange flights that arrive before (and depart after) the group. However, we do have to make it clear in your final documentation that if your flights are delayed, the transfer cannot wait for you. While Exodus or our local operators will do what we can to help you reach the start point of the tour, any additional costs must be paid by the client. 

 

Next steps? 

Call our Sales team on: 0203 733 0698

Email your query: [email protected]

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